Lynne F. Stewart was born October 8, 1939 in Brooklyn, NY, and she eventually attended American University, Wagner College, Pratt University, and Rutgers University School of Law, before eventually being admitted to the New Jersey and New York bars. However, Stewart is not as well known for her work in the court room as she is for an infamous charge brought against her following the terrorist bombings of the World Trade Center in 1993. Stewart was charged with allegedly aiding and abetting the terrorists directly involved with the bombing of the World Trade Center.

Stewart Accused of Aiding Terrorists

Following the charges brought up against Lynne Stewart, she launched her own web site (www.lynnestewart.org), which targeted her opposition and sough to give a voice to her cause. Describing herself as a “radical human rights attorney,” Lynne Stewart claims that she was falsely accused of helping terrorists during the attacks on the World Trade Center buildings in 1993. Though she was arrested in 2002 and had her office searched by federal agents, Stewart claims that these are simply attempts by the government to silence her cause and “install fear” in those who might be partial to the government’s racism. Above all, whether Muslim, Arab, or otherwise, Stewart has pleaded with the government to allow her to practice law and fight for the rights of those having their rights to freedom and free speech shut down.

Stewart Seeking Change

Lynne Stewart has long been considered one of the more controversial lawyers in America, simply for her actions and words following the World Trade Center bombing in 1993. Whether intentional or not, Stewart is accused of transmitting information to terrorists involved in the attack. Her reputation as a risqué lawyer willing to take risks in the name of freedom is highlighted by her actions in the light of the WTC bombing incident. In light of the incidents, Stewart hopes to bring about change in the perception of her own character, as well as lawyers and attorneys with similar intentions.